Thailand: Bangkok

Delightful Afternoon in "Pakistan"

Bangkok

Thailand

Sunday

July 15, 2018

 

Hello,

I had the most delightful afternoon at the Queen Sirikit National Convention Center.  I attended the “Pakistan Single Country Exhibition.”

My goal was to obtain tourist information.  I had heard excellent stories from a group of German motorcyclists who I met last year in Tashkurgan, Xinjiang Province, China near the Pakistan border.  I had traveled from Kashgar through some spectacular mountain scenery.   Apparently, to the west, the Karakorum Highway in Pakistan is even more spectacular.

At the exhibit today, I did find a few brochures about the mountain and lake regions of Pakistan.  But the convention center had exhibitors from a variety of other businesses: Rock Salt Products, Marble and Onyx, Wooden Furniture, Rugs, Gems and Jewelry, Garments and Textiles, Agro Foods, Brass Artifacts, Cutlery, Surgical Instruments, Sports Goods, Leather, Fishery, Pipe and Steel, Handicrafts, and of course, a Food Court.

Bris and Bar Mitzvah in Bangkok

Bangkok

Thailand

March 22, 2018

 

The Chasids know how to party!

This month I was invited to two celebrations.

Rabbi Moshe Hadad and his wife Elisheva invited me to the Bris of their son Yaakov Yehuda.

The ceremony took place in our* temporary shul.  A new one is under construction across the street.

The Bris itself was part solemn and part joyful.  But the luncheon served later was 100% joyful.

On Sunday March 18, I was invited to attend the Bar Mitzvah of Yaakov Hadad, the son of Rabbi David and Mrs. Nechama Hadad, the brother and sister-in-law of Rabbi Moshe.

The Bar Mitzvah meal was creative and delicious and bountiful.  But the dancing!  Oye, the dancing!  Joyful does not begin to describe this celebration.

Spirituality at a Bangkok Synagogue

This essay was published in To Thailand With Love by ThingsAsian Press.  2013

 

As I descend towards Suvarnabhumi Airport, Wat Sothon Wararam Worawihan appears below.  Since the population of Thailand is 95 percent Buddhist, a temple complex near the airport is not unexpected.  What is unexpected is the large Aeyatul Muslimin mosque that towers beside the airport expressway en route to downtown Bangkok.  

Most Thai Muslims live in Southern Thailand, near Malaysia, but there is a sufficient population in the capital to support more than 100 local mosques.  Citizens of the Hindu faith maintain several mandirs.   

Christians of every denomination attend large churches or smaller neighborhood assemblies.  

As an American Jew who retired to Bangkok, I expected to find a semblance of Jewish life in this city.  But what took me by surprise was the vibrancy of the small yet devoted community.  I met Jews from the Americas, Israel, Australia, France, England, Romania, Hungary, South Africa, Afghanistan, and the Middle East.  

A BIG Birthday

Bangkok

Thailand

August 15, 2011

Dear Barbara,

I am following up on your “Big Birthday” theme for our Taft High School Newsletter.

 I am not one of the “young ones.”   My “BIG One” was last September, 2010.

I thought that our friends and classmates would like to see the birthday party photos since my celebration was here in Bangkok; the party had a decidedly international flavor.

We had dinner at the Tamnan Thai restaurant near my apartment in downtown Bangkok: traditional Thai dishes both spicy and not, cold beer both Thai and not.

The cast of characters included two Thai ladies, my good friend Noy, and another friend Nai and her daughter Samantha, Harry from Afghanistan, Gary from South

Bangkok: "Loi Kratong"

Bangkok

24 November 2010

Dear Family and Friends,

My friend Noy and I celebrated Loi Krathong on Sunday.  Along with thousands of other celebrants we floated our krathong on the Chao Phraya River.

Loi Krathong takes place on the evening of the full moon of the 12th month in the traditional Thai lunar calendar. In the Western calendar this holiday usually falls in November.

"Loi" means "to float" and a "krathong" is traditionally made from a section of banana tree trunk. Modern krathongs are more often made of bread.  Regardless of the composition, a krathong will be decorated with elaborately-folded banana leaves, flowers, candles and incense sticks. A low value coin is sometimes included as an offering to the river spirits.

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